Hanze Research Day 2019

We would like to invite your to the seventh edition of the Hanze Research Day on Tuesday 29 January 2019. Open Science is the main theme during the Hanze Research Day 2019.

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Programme

Location: Zernikeplein 11 (Van DoorenVeste), Groningen.

9.00 uur             Opening by Paul van der Wijk, member of the Executive Board
9.05 uur             Jon Tennant - What do penguins, cobras, and Gimli have to do with
                          Open Science?
10.00 uur           Workshop round 1
10.45 uur           Coffee break and poster presentations
11.15 uur           Workshop round 2
12.00 uur           Lunch and poster presentations
13.00 uur           Afternoon programme

Jon Tennant - 'What do penguins, cobras, and Gimli have to do with Open Science?'

The morning programme will kick off with a keynote speech by Jon Tennant. During the Hanze Research Day, Jon Tennant will present the thought-provoking claim that open science is, in reality, not terribly remarkable. What do penguins, cobras, and Gimli from Lord of the Rings have to do with Open Science? Find out at the keynote address. The keynote is in English. 

Workshops and afternoon programme

You can find more information on the workshops and the afternoon programme below.

Photos and video blog

During the Hanze Research Day, SURF will produce a video blog on Open Science at Hanze University of Applied Sciences Groningen, and a photographer will be there to capture the events of the day. If you'd prefer not to take part in this, please let the maker of the video and the photographer know.

Parking

You can park in car park P3. Exit tickets will be available at the end of the day.
Click here for a map.

Sign up

Want to experience the Hanze Research Day 2019? Please sign up by using this form. Want to organise a poster presentation? Let us know using the form.


Workshop round 1​

1. Open science - step by step (in Dutch)

There is no one definitive way of doing open science – there are many different opportunities for working more openly in all phases of research. In this workshop, you will explore for yourself which ways of applying open science might be interesting and useful to you. We will use these examples to discuss together what open science can mean for individual researchers, for science and for society.

Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer, specialists scientific information provision, University Library Utrecht.

2. Musicscape: open data in our common interest? (in Dutch, this workshop is offered in English during the second workshop round)

While writing his thesis in 2010, Evert Bisschop Boele (professor of Education in Arts) researched the offer of public live music events in the city of Groningen. He called the results of this research 'Musicscape Groningen'. The project was taken over by a colleague in Utrecht, who produced a 'Musicscape Utrecht' three times. The raw data has now been published in Dataverse and made available to all, with an accompanying article in the Open Access Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences. In this session, we will consider why open data is important in this case, and why there are situations where its importance is up for debate.

Prof. dr. Evert Bisschop Boele, professor Arts and Education at Hanze UAS, Groningen

3. Create history – towards a Bellingcat for historical archives? Audience participation at the Groninger Archives (in Dutch)

In 2017, the Groningen Archives launched projects to get the public actively involved in its collection and to make its displays more attractive. Its objectives can be summarised in three words: document, publish and reuse. This takes place under the banner of Make History (Maak Geschiedenis). The working methods are based on crowdsourcing: getting people to work with digital materials at home. The first project of this kind, on the Christmas Floods of 1717, was relatively straightforward: people were invited to transcribe texts (convert them into modern letters) at home and to relate what they found in sources and literature. The Groningen Archives expect this approach to become increasingly popular, while the working methods are becoming more complex.

In this workshop, I will explain why we decided to adopt this approach, introduce you to it in a hands-on way and share our experiences with you. More particularly, I am interested to know what opportunities you see for this in your own particular field of expertise. Click here for more information.

Jona van Keulen, head Public activities and government archivist at the Groninger Archives.

4. Science, students and sex (in Dutch)

Every semester, some 85 students from 15 different degree programmes conduct research in the NoorderRuimte, Research Centre for Built Environment). Th research relates to socially relevant issues from professional practice, all of which are related to the built environment in the Northern Netherlands. NoorderRuimte wants to be able to share freely all the knowledge that has been acquired, amongst other things for the purposes of follow-up research. We already share student theses via the website and the HBO Knowledge Base. But what do you need in order to be able to publish the work of students along the proper channels? During this interactive session, we will explore with you the pitfalls of open science and we will look at issues concerning confidentiality, intellectual property and the use of research results for follow-up research or publications.

Open science; a new topic that is only possible if we work together…

Liesbeth Jorritsma, programme manager NoorderRuimte, Research Centre for Built Environment
Rixt Froentjes, coördinator IWP bureau NoorderRuimte (bNR)

5. Energieopwek.nl (in Dutch)

In conjunction with partners, the Centre Expertise Energy has developed a website for the Social and Economic Council (SER) where we provide access to all kinds of data in order to provide real-time insights into the generation of sustainable energy in the Netherlands.

Clearly, this is not open science in the strictest sense of the word, but it's an initiative that makes data available to a broad audience. In addition, it offers Martien a platform to communicate via social media, increasing his visibility in the public debate. This may help explain why Energieopwek.nl was nominated for the Public Outreach award at a major specialist conference.

Dr. Martien Visser, professor Power and Energy Distribution

How to present yourself and your research online? (continuous programme)

There are various ways of presenting yourself and your research online. During the Hanze Research Day, we offer the following tools:

Profile check for LinkedIn and Research.hanze.nl During the Hanze Research Day, you can have your LinkedIn profile checked and we will look at how you present yourself and your research or specialisation. Need a profile photo? You can get one on the day. Your photo will be taken by photographer Luuk Steemers.

Can I control what is displayed on my profile page on Research.hanze.nl?

Of course! Check your profile on Pure Portal (research.hanze.nl) on the Hanze Research Day. Are your research and your personal profile displayed as you want them? Modify your personal profile on the day and select the research output that you want to highlight!

Nynke van Dijk, social media advisor at Hanze UAS, Groningen
Channa van der Veen, social media team Hanze UAS, Groningen
Ryan Silvin, Functional manager Pure
Luuk Steemers, photographer


Workshop round 2

1. How to use open science to become more visible and amplify your work? (In English)

This workshop is designed for researchers who want to build their online presence while amplifying their work. Think of this task like a way of creating an online CV for showcasing your research. These tools are based around documenting your research publications (ORCID) and the online attention these get (ImpactStory). If there is interest your peer reviewer profile (Publons), research collaboration in the open (Open Science Framework) and the relation with Pure and ResearchGate will be discussed as well. This workshop will utilize material from the OpenScienceMOOC.

Jon Tennant, Nomadic Palaeontologist, Rogue Open Scientist; PhD, MEarthSci, MSc

2. Musicscape: open data in our common interest? (in English)

While writing his thesis in 2010, Evert Bisschop Boele (professor of Education in Arts) researched the offer of public live music events in the city of Groningen. He called the results of this research 'Musicscape Groningen'. The project was taken over by a colleague in Utrecht, who produced a 'Musicscape Utrecht' three times. The raw data has now been published in Dataverse and made available to all, with an accompanying article in the Open Access Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences. In this session, we will consider why open data is important in this case, and why there are situations where its importance is up for debate. Professor earthquake-resistant construction will join Evert and will share his experiences with open science during this workshop

Prof. dr. Evert Bisschop Boele, professor Arts and Education at Hanze UAS, Groningen

3. Practical ethics in research (in Dutch)

Ethical research is important, but how do you put it into practice? In this interactive session, the Hanze Ethical Review Board will take you through the key points with the help of a presentation, quiz and discussion. Don't forget to bring your questions, information letters and consent forms with you! The last 20 minutes will be set aside for a Q&A.

Dr. Jacquelien Rothfusz, university lecturer in Applied Psychology and member of the Hanze Ethical Review Board (HEAC)

Dr. Remo Mombarg, professor of Physical Education and Youth Sport and member of the Hanze Ethical Review Board (HEAC)

4: Data stewardship (in Dutch)

In this workshop we will explore how researchers can make their data FAIR and what kind of support they need and expect for doing this. We will match the result with the research support model which has been developed after the experiments we did with research datamanagement last year and which will be implemented in 2019.  

Henk van der Zijden, demandmanager Staff Office Computing and Information Services, domain research
Wilma Abbink en Fienke Strijbos, information specialists

5. Developing an open access journal (in Dutch)

What are the steps you need to take when wanting to publish an open acces journal? During this workshop Maarten Hogenstijn shares his experiences. Together with collegues from the Netherlands and abroad, and the Hanze Library Maarten launched the international open acces journal: the Journal of the European Honors Council (www.jehc.eu).

After a short introduction we answer questions from the particpants. Where to start? What do you need? Who do you need? How to get into the Directory of Open Acces Journals? How to arrange the needed licenses? How can the Hanze Library help? We hope to discuss as many questions as possible and hope to help you along the way.

Maarten Hogenstijn, Ph.D., senior researcher project leader Honors in Europe / CoTalent

How to present yourself and your research online? (continuous programme)

There are various ways of presenting yourself and your research online. During the Hanze Research Day, we offer the following tools:

Profile check for LinkedIn and Research.hanze.nl During the Hanze Research Day, you can have your LinkedIn profile checked and we will look at how you present yourself and your research or specialisation. Need a profile photo? You can get one on the day. Your photo will be taken by photographer Luuk Steemers.

Can I control what is displayed on my profile page on Research.hanze.nl?

Of course! Check your profile on Pure Portal (research.hanze.nl) on the Hanze Research Day. Are your research and your personal profile displayed as you want them? Modify your personal profile on the day and select the research output that you want to highlight!

Nynke van Dijk, social media advisor at Hanze UAS, Groningen
Channa van der Veen, social media team Hanze UAS, Groningen
Ryan Silvin, Functional manager Pure
Luuk Steemers, photographer


 

Afternoon programme

Internal conference – Marian van Os Centre for Entrepreneurship (CVO)

Location: Willem-Alexander Sports Centre, Zernikeplein 17 (A001) Max. 80 participants (including CVO staff)

The internal conference of the Marian van Os Centre for Entrepreneurship will take place on the afternoon of Tuesday 29 January. This is an annual gathering for everyone involved with or interested in the work of the Centre for Entrepreneurship.

This year, the internal conference coincides with the Hanze Research Day and will form the afternoon programme for the Hanze Research Day. The central theme is:

Entrepreneurship research by the professorship Entrepreneurship for Change (link between education and research) and Entrepreneurship Education and Support (HanzeOndernemen). During this meeting, PhD candidates, lecturer and student researchers and project leaders from the Centre for Entrepreneurship will present their research and projects. The conference will provide a fascinating insight into the research and projects that are currently under way. Are you keen to acquire, share and link knowledge? We look forward to seeing you there!

Programma

13.00 – 13.30 uurArrival, coffee/tea
13.30 – 14.00 uurOpening
14.00 – 14.45 uur

 
Central theme explained
- Entrepreneurship research by the professorship Entrepreneurship for Change (link between education and research)
- Entrepreneurship Education and Support (HanzeOndernemen)
14.45 – 15.15 uurPitches (plenary)
15.15 – 16.15 uurSpeeddating based on pitches (individual)
16.15 – 16.20 uurPresentation of Best Poster Award
16.20 – 17.00 uurNetworking drinks
 

Research Centre Biobased Economy: Dare to share! I was there. Where were you?

Location: to be advised
Time: 13:00-15:30
Max. 60 participants

The Research Centre Biobased Economy contributes to a healthy and sustainable society by further developing, sharing and commercialising knowledge of the circular and biobased economy.

The research centre works proactively and in a targeted way on Hanze UAS's focus areas of Healthy Ageing, Entrepreneurship and Energy. It also works on other themes, such as data science. Consequently, it has all kinds of links with other research centres and centres of expertise. That's why we're happy to do double work, flirt with plagiarism and cross over into different territories!

Based on a number of specific examples, including the master's in Data Science for Life Sciences, the recently submitted RAAK-PRO application 'Monitoring of Bee Health', the Living Lab Allergies and Food and the Living Lab Blue Zone Appingedam, we want to enter into a dialogue with delegates regarding the following questions: - How can we collaborate more (in an interdisciplinary way)? - What impedes collaboration? - How can we remove these impediments? - What collaboration is possible? - How can we achieve this collaboration?

By whom? Various university lecturers and professors.

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